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IMPORTANT:

If you feel like you are having a medical emergency, please call 9-1-1.

If you are experiencing severe trouble breathing, continuous pain or pressure in your chest, feeling confused or having difficulty waking up, blue-colored lips or face, or any other emergency signs or symptoms, please seek immediate medical care.

Pediatric Questions

Testing is available for children 4 years of age and older.

If your child has new or worsening emergency warning signs, such as severe trouble breathing, pain or pressure in the chest, feeling confused or having difficulty waking up, or blue-colored lips or face, call 911 or seek emergency medical attention instead of ordering this test.

Your child should get tested if:

  • They have symptoms of COVID-19
  • They live in or visit a place where people reside, meet, or gather in close proximity. This can include homeless shelters, group homes, detention centers, playgroups, schools, church, camp, daycare, etc.
  • They have been in close contact with someone with confirmed COVID-19 within the past14 days

This test may also be helpful if:

  • Your child may have been exposed and has an underlying condition that may increase the risk for severe disease

If you have any other questions, we recommend that you speak with your child’s primary healthcare provider about testing recommendations to see if testing is right for your child at this time.

This test may be right for your child if they:

  • Have been diagnosed with COVID-19, it has been at least 10 days since their diagnosis, and you want to know if they have antibodies.
  • Have not had symptoms and have not had a known exposure to COVID-19 within the last 10 days, but you want to see if they have antibodies.
  • Have had or you suspect they have had COVID-19, but your child has not experienced any new symptoms in the past 10 days.
  • Have had or you suspect they have had COVID-19, but your child has not experienced a fever in the past 24 hours.
  • It is important to set realistic expectations. Do not pretend the testing experience will be painless. Reassure your child that the testing process will be quick, the pain won’t last, and that you’ll be with them the entire time. After the test, praise and comfort your child as needed.
  • Make sure your child is tested when they are less likely to be tired or hungry. Your child does not need to fast or stop taking any medications before testing. Eating and drinking plenty of water before the test will help lower the risk of lightheadedness and can help make the process smoother.
  • Talk about feelings or practice calming techniques before the test. You can do this by making a game of staying still or practicing breathing exercises with your child. It may also be helpful to distract your child during the procedure.
  • Before testing, discuss any concerns and questions with your child’s primary healthcare provider. Further instructions will be provided to you at the lab or in your test kit

- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Caring for Children
- World Health Organization: COVID-19 Resources for Care for Young Children

Please note: The antibody tests and the molecular tests (together referred to as “tests”) have not been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Pediatric FAQs Continued

Based on all available evidence, children do not have a higher risk of getting COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants get sick with the virus, adults make up most of the known cases. Most cases in children occur due to exposure from someone in their household. Hospitalization is most common in children less than 1 year old and those with underlying conditions (such as lung diseases or moderate to severe asthma, heart complications, or weakened immune systems from cancer, medications, or transplants).

You can protect your child from COVID-19 by encouraging them to take the same safety precautions as everyone else:
● Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
● Stay home when you are sick, unless you are seeking medical care.
● Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces (including tables, doorknobs,light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks).
● Launder items, including washable plush toys, using the warmest water setting allowed for the items. Dry them completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
● Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
● Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if soap and water aren’t available. Always wash hands with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.
● Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Be sure to also track and follow community safety measures, such as school closures. Discourage children and teens from gathering in other public places while school is closed to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community.

The symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. However, children with the virus generally have mild symptoms and recover within one to two weeks. Symptoms in children include:
● Fever
● Cough
● Nasal congestion or runny nose
● Sore throat
● Shortness of breath
● Nausea or vomiting
● Diarrhea
● Tiredness
● Headache and muscle aches
● Refusing to eat or drink
● New loss of taste or smell
There is more to be learned about how the disease impacts children. For example, it’s not yet known whether some children may be at higher risk for severe illness, such as children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs.

If your child develops symptoms of COVID-19, it is important to closely monitor them. Most people, including children, develop mild symptoms that resolve within two weeks. If your child develops symptoms of COVID-19, talk to your child’s healthcare provider about steps you should take to help your child recover at home. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends both children and adults follow the same steps if they have the virus. See those steps here. Notify your child’s healthcare provider if someone else in your house becomes sick with COVID-19, so they can provide any advice specific for your child.

If your child has new or worsening emergency warning signs , such as severe trouble breathing, pain or pressure in the chest, feeling confused or having difficulty waking up, or blue-colored lips or face, call 911. When you call, tell the operator you suspect your child has COVID-19 so that first responders can protect themselves and others.

Children can be tested for antibodies, since they may make up a large portion of the population that are asymptomatic (no symptoms) or have only mild symptoms when infected with COVID-19.

Antibody tests can play a critical role in the fight against COVID-19. They help healthcare providers identify individuals who have antibodies to the virus and have developed an immune response. In the future, these tests, along with other data, may potentially help determine whether individuals with antibodies have immunity or are less likely to get reinfected. At this time, however, it is unknown how long antibodies last and whether having antibodies means that an individual is immune.

New evidence suggests that children who have or have had COVID-19 may develop an inflammatory condition similar to Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome up to 4 weeks after their infection. This condition is called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) . If you suspect that your child has symptoms of this inflammatory syndrome (fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, eye redness, or feeling overly tired), be sure to see your child’s healthcare provider right away. The good news is that this condition is treatable when caught early.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that in individuals who have not been tested for COVID-19 and have symptoms of a condition that occurs after COVID-19 infection (like MIS-C), PCR and antibody testing may be used for further evaluation. Follow up with your child’s healthcare provider for further information about testing related to MIS-C.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that every person aged 2 years and older wear a cloth covering or mask that covers their nose and mouth when they are out

in public places. Cloth face coverings should NOT be put on babies or children younger than 2 because of the danger of suffocation. Wearing cloth face coverings is one safety measure that can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 when used in addition to other measures such as social distancing and frequent hand washing.

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your child about the outbreak and reassure them that they are safe. When you speak, try to remain calm. Explain to your child that most illnesses from COVID-19 seem to be mild. Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults. If you need support, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers resources to help talk with children about COVID-19.

It is important that your child limits time with other children. If children meet in groups, it can put everyone at risk. Children can pass this virus to others who have an increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If children are playing outside their own homes, it is essential that they remain 6 feet from anyone who is not in their own household. For more information, visit the CDC website.

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your child about the outbreak and reassure them that they are safe. When you speak, try to remain calm. Explain to your child that most illnesses from COVID-19 seem to be mild. Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults. If you need support, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers resources to help talk with children about COVID-19.

It is important that your child limits time with people who may be at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If others in your home have an increased risk, consider extra safety precautions to help separate your child from those people. Consider postponing visits or trips to see older family members and grandparents.

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